Tag Archives: Hoover Institute

10 Leading Indicators of U.S. Healthcare Superiority- #10

Finally, the last one.

Americans are responsible for the vast majority of all health care innovations. The top five U.S. hospitals conduct more clinical trials than all the hospitals in any other developed country. Since the mid- 1970s, the Nobel Prize in medicine or physiology has gone to U.S. residents more often than recipients from all other countries combined. In only five of the past thirty-four years did a scientist living in the United States not win or share in the prize. Most important recent medical innovations were developed in the United States.

Despite serious challenges, such as escalating costs and care for the uninsured, the U.S. health care system compares favorably to those in other developed countries.

Via Hot Air, via Jonah Goldberg at the Corner, via The Hoover Institute’s Scott Atlas.

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10 Leading Indicators of U.S. Healthcare Superioity- #9

Americans have better access to important new technologies such as medical imaging than do patients in Canada or Britain. An overwhelming majority of leading American physicians identify computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the most important medical innovations for improving patient care during the previous decade—even as economists and policy makers unfamiliar with actual medical practice decry these techniques as wasteful. The United States has thirty-four CT scanners per million Americans, compared to twelve in Canada and eight in Britain. The United States has almost twenty-seven MRI machines per million people compared to about six per million in Canada and Britain.

Via Hot Air, via Jonah Goldberg at the Corner, via The Hoover Institute’s Scott Atlas.

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10 Leading Indicators of U.S. Healthcare Superiority- #8

Americans are more satisfied with the care they receive than Canadians. When asked about their own health care instead of the “health care system,” more than half of Americans (51.3 percent) are very satisfied with their health care services, compared with only 41.5 percent of Canadians; a lower proportion of Americans are dissatisfied (6.8 percent) than Canadians (8.5 percent).

Via Hot Air, via Jonah Goldberg at the Corner, via The Hoover Institute’s Scott Atlas.

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10 Leading Indicators of U.S. Healthcare Superiority- #7

7. People in countries with more government control of health care are highly dissatisfied and believe reform is needed. More than 70 percent of German, Canadian, Australian, New Zealand, and British adults say their health system needs either “fundamental change” or “complete rebuilding.”

Via Hot Air, via Jonah Goldberg at the Corner, via The Hoover Institute’s Scott Atlas.

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10 Leading Indicators of U.S. Healthcare Superiority- #6

6. Americans spend less time waiting for care than patients in Canada and the United Kingdom. Canadian and British patients wait about twice as long—sometimes more than a year—to see a specialist, have elective surgery such as hip replacements, or get radiation treatment for cancer. All told, 827,429 people are waiting for some type of procedure in Canada. In Britain, nearly 1.8 million people are waiting for a hospital admission or outpatient treatment.

Via Hot Air, via Jonah Goldberg at the Corner, via The Hoover Institute’s Scott Atlas.

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10 Leading Indicators of U.S. Healthcare Superiority- #5

5. Lower-income Americans are in better health than comparable Canadians. Twice as many American seniors with below-median incomes self-report “excellent” health (11.7 percent) compared to Canadian seniors (5.8 percent). Conversely, white, young Canadian adults with below-median incomes are 20 percent more likely than lower-income Americans to describe their health as “fair or poor.”

Via Hot Air, via Jonah Goldberg at the Corner, via The Hoover Institute’s Scott Atlas.

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10 Leading Indicators of U.S. Healthcare Superiority -#4

4. Americans have better access to preventive cancer screening than Canadians. Take the proportion of the appropriate-age population groups who have received recommended tests for breast, cervical, prostate, and colon cancer:

  • Nine out of ten middle-aged American women (89 percent) have had a mammogram, compared to fewer than three-fourths of Canadians (72 percent).
  • Nearly all American women (96 percent) have had a Pap smear, compared to fewer than 90 percent of Canadians.
  • More than half of American men (54 percent) have had a prostatespecific antigen (PSA) test, compared to fewer than one in six Canadians (16 percent).
  • Nearly one-third of Americans (30 percent) have had a colonoscopy, compared with fewer than one in twenty Canadians (5 percent).

Via Hot Air, via Jonah Goldberg at the Corner, via The Hoover Institute’s Scott Atlas

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